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Posts Tagged ‘Walk-Out’

May Day 2012

In California, Privatization on May 1, 2012 at 12:30 am

FROM THE OCCUPY SAN DIEGO FACEBOOK EVENT FOR MAY DAY 2012:

No work. No school. No Banking. No Shopping. A day without the 99% is a day people all over the world can stand up to the powers that be and say “Enough is enough!” Join us! (If you can’t, at least take the day off or change your profile picture!)

On May 1st, 2012 every continent, every country, every state, every city will stand up!

11am CITY COLLEGE RALLY
12pm SOLIDARITY MARCH – CIVIC CENTER
3:30pm EDUCATION CUTS RALLY – ROOSEVELT MIDDLE SCHOOL
4pm-6pm WORKER RALLY – CIVIC CENTER
5:30pm CHICANO PARK FESTIVAL

Participating Organizations:

SEIU USWW | UFCW LOCAL 135| UNITEHERE LOCAL 30 | UNION DEL BARRIO | SD LABOR COUNCIL | UNITED TAXI WORKERS | AFT | OCCUPY LABOR SOLIDARITY | ACCE | ICWJ | ANAKBAYAN SD | CENTER OF POLICY INITIATIVES | DOMESTIC WORKER CAMPAIGN | CANVASS FOR A CAUSE | AFSC SD | EMPLOYEE RIGHTS CENTER | LA INVASORA 99.7FM | EQUALITY ALLIANCE SD | UPTE-CWA 9119 | S.A.M.E. | OSD | PARTY FOR SOCIALISM & LIBERATION | ANIMAL PROTECTION & RESCUE LEAGUE | INTERNATIONAL SOCIALIST ORGANIZATION | IWW | OCUPEMOS EL BARRIO | AMALGAMATED TRANSIT UNION LOCAL 1309 | OCCUPYRCORNER | STUDENTS FROM SDSU, USD, CITY COLLEGE, UCSD & MORE!

MAY DAY 2012: A day without the 99%.

May day is about the debt imposed on you for daring to dream about a college education.

It’s about the healthcare you can’t afford, the family member with a disease which goes untreated because they lack insurance.

It’s about your car that got repo-ed after you lost your job.

It’s about your home that got foreclosed on by the bank.

It’s about your family, who came here for a better future, and got lost in the broken immigration system, and found that they’re denied access to legal work, education and security because they’re undocumented.

It’s about you, the gay kid who gets bullied at school, and will grow up in a country which denies you equality and humanity, simply because you love someone of the same gender.

It’s about the fact there’s no jobs, even if you got that college education and those grades.

It’s about the single mother who struggles to support her kids on minimum wage – which is not a living wage.

It’s about the woman who makes it through Harvard, works her butt off in one of the best law firms in the country, and constantly loses out on that promotion because she’s not a man.

It’s about the homeless African-American man who lives on the street and gets thrown in jail for peeing in a park, because there are no toilet facilities on the street for those like him.

It’s about the protestor who gets beaten and thrown in jail for holding a sign in a public space which says he want equality.

It’s about the farmer who’s had to leave his home and work, because the state raised his land tax.

It’s about the father who loses a son to a pointless war over oil in a foreign land.

It’s about the fact this is not the America we were brought up to believe in.

IT’S TIME TO TAKE TO THE STREETS!

This event has been organized by workers, union and non union to tell the 1% NO MORE! We will be marching from Civic Center to demonstrate in front of the banks that have taken our homes, the state building for taking our medical care, the ICE building that has deported and destroyed families and all other places that have waged a war on working people!!

More info visit: www.occupylaborsolidarity.org or http://www.occupymay1st.org/Seemore

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Chancellor Fox’s “Response” to the March 1st Demands

In California, Privatization, Reclaim Chancellor's Complex on March 8, 2012 at 5:01 pm

Dear Public Education Coalition:

We appreciate your initiative to organize activities on March 1 in support of public education in California. We support events that draw attention to the increasing challenges our University community faces because of the erosion of state funding, and we fully agree with the call for California to once again support the California Master Plan of Education as an integral facet of economic stability for our state’s families. We will continue to press the case for investment in the UC with out elected representatives in Sacramento.

You also have articulated a series of campus-specific, budget-related demands that range from support for selected academic support programs to access to campus spaces. We have and will continue to work across the campus to fairly accommodate the budget reductions that have touched every aspect of campus life. We take very seriously our responsibility to oversee the campus resources to benefit all. As we make these difficult decisions, we will continue to give strong consideration to input from all segments of the campus community.

Since 1990, the state’s contribution to educating each UC student has dropped more than 50%. The magnitude of the cutbacks cannot continue without seriously affecting the quality of education at the University of California. We share your disappointment and frustration with the deep and lasting budget cuts. Therefore, we encourage you to join the UC Regents and colleagues from all campuses on May 17, 2012 for a march on Sacramento. Our unified support can make a difference for current and future students.

Sincerely,

Marye Anne Fox

Chancellor

c: Executive Vice Chancellor

Vice Chancellors

March 1st: Retrospect Gallery

In California, Privatization on March 4, 2012 at 1:35 pm

On March 1st, UCSD student’s held a demonstration against budget cuts, fee hikes, worker’s marginalization and the inequity of the K-12 system. To contribute photos or learn more about continued participation in fighting for educational and social justice email: marchformarch2012@gmail.com

Photo: Cat Martini

Photos: Sharon Bach

Hit and Run at UCSC Lock-Down Un-Arrested

In California, Privatization on March 3, 2012 at 7:26 pm

Around 8:30 this morning (March 1, 2012) a red Ford Mustang tried to rush the crowd of students blocking off the main entrence of the UC Santa Cruz campus at Bay and High Street. The driver showed no signs of stopping as he turned the corner to go up to the main campus, and injured several students in an attempt to break through the crowd. The strike line held strong and Santa Cruz police chief was just feet away from the scene when he responded to the driver, telling him to back away from the crowd. As a student threw a container of yogurt onto the windshield of the Mustang, the man backed away to be questioned by Nadar. After some questioning the man drove away, his car damaged from the angry student activists, without being arrested.

The crowd was angry, and this man deserved to be arrested on the spot for unprovoked assault. We demand the Santa Cruz police department take decisive action against the assailant.

PLEASE SHARE AND SPREAD THIS VIDEO

Adam Odsess-Rubin
Community Studies | Theater Arts
Porter College 2014
University of California- Santa Cruz

Open Letter to AVP Athletic Relations

In D1 Referendum 2012 on February 28, 2012 at 5:47 pm

[This letter was sent to Aurora Lopez, AVP Athletic Relations, on February 26th. It is intended to address the entire athletic community.]

Dear Aurora,

I am personally writing to you about March 1st because I have been quite vocal against the DI referendum, and because I am sure that the athletics community feels that March 1st is not for them. I entreat you to support March 1st by encouraging athletes to attend, by forwarding this email to your athletics contacts, and by attending yourself.

I want to emphasize to you, and to the athletic community in general, that March 1st is a day for education first and foremost, and that there are problems with our public education system which directly affect athletes. The loss of state funding has seriously harmed athletics programs at UCSB, UCI, UCR and UCD to name just a few. Increased system-wide mandatory fees harm athletes just as they harm other students, if not more because athletes already have such full schedules.

Unfortunately, for many students the fight is against any increase in fees for which they perceive no benefit. Many of the organizers for March 1st fall within that group, and so the issues of state-wide fees (which affect us all) and campus fees (like DI) have been run together. The reaction against the DI referendum is a product of the current atmosphere of fee escalation. If the regents and UCOP were not facing the possibility of raising fees by 16% annually, the D1 referendum would be far less contentious than it has proven to be.

I believe our athletes deserve to advance to DI. We are the largest school in DII and we already have three sports in DI. That being said, all students have been made to suffer through cut backs, and fee increases, not just athletes. We all deserve a better, more affordable education, and while we will have different priorities I believe we can all agree there are problems within our system which are unacceptable to everyone.

Athletics are an important part of a college experience, and neither I, nor anyone I have spoken to, is against DI in and of itself. It is part of the tragedy of our system that many students feel they cannot support program improvements they would otherwise love to have.

Please show your solidarity.

Sincerely,

Kevin Quirolo

Statement at ASUCSD Public Input Session 2/22/12

In Privatization on February 22, 2012 at 11:26 pm

I come tonight to express my deep disappointment with ASUCSD.

On Wednesday, February 8th, a Resolution to support March 1st and the Call to Action from the Public Education Coalition was passed by this governing body.

The language in this resolution is quite explicit in its declaration for AS to fully and actively support this call to action.

There have been lots of discussions lately about why AS as a body needs to maintain its neutrality on the position of Division 1 Athletics, while still encouraging students to vote; however, individual members are well within their rights to express personal opinions and stances on this issue.

The way I see it, this resolution supporting March 1st binds AS as a body to actively support and educate the student body and the University Administration about March 1st and help garner support for it.

When I went to UC Riverside for the Regents meeting on January 19th, ASUCR was out there in the streets with us the whole time. They were passing out buttons and shirts that said “AS – Taking A Stand 2012.” They led chants and they were there when the cops showed up. They were exhibiting true leadership throughout the day.

Then I came back to UCSD, and what did I see? I saw student government bringing an election to students that will potentially have them raising fees on themselves in one vote; and including a survey question that hides proposed budget numbers from the greater student population and, in my opinion, delegitimizes students’ efforts to reclaim our university from the poisonous effects of fee hikes and privatization.

That’s not what I want to see from my student government. I want to see students dedicated to the issues that are hitting them the hardest. I want to see this body dedicated to issues that are greater than profit margins and resumé padding. Read the rest of this entry »

CALL TO ACTION: March 1st

In California, Privatization on February 21, 2012 at 2:45 am

[Please share this call to action with your friends, professors, colleagues, TAs, PIs, roommates, and who ever else you think should read it]

Students, instructors and staff you have a stake in the future of the UC. The public nature of the UC is under threat, but on March 1st we are coming together to defend it.

Students, mandatory fees set by the regents have more than doubled since 2001 adjusted for inflation.[1] At the same time, UCSD’s average debt at graduation increased 20%.[2] In 2009, 48% of UCSD students graduated with debt at an average of $18,757.[3] Since 1990 expenditure per student has fallen over 19%.[4] At the same time state support per student fell 60% while tuition support more than tripled.[5] The UC shifted from public funding toward personal, private funding. This shift was not and is not inevitable. Students: the ability of many of your qualified colleagues to attend a UC is threatened by this shift,[6] but you can help.

Instructors, between 1995 and 2010, while positions for teaching in the UC system increased 48%, positions in senior management increased 182%.[7] In 2007, a retired UC Berkeley professor estimated the excess growth in senior management to cost the UC $603 million annually.[8] As instructors retire they are not replaced,[9] and some of your colleagues at UCSD were recently recruited to a private institution.[10] The UC is moving from academic to entrepreneur. This movement is not inevitable. Instructors: the priority for the UC to attract, retain and support your colleagues has been misplaced, but you can help.

Staff, starting in 1999 the UC regents began to funnel pension fund money into riskier investments. Since 2004 billions of dollars have been invested through private investment firms which are non-transparent, lightly regulated, highly risky, and which have charged the UC tens of millions of dollars so far.[11] The UC’s pension and investment portfolios lost $23 billion in the 2008 financial crisis, some of which were made against the advice of a former treasurer[12] and in full awareness of the risk.[13] The UC is now asking for workers to pay into the pension system as they cut benefits to absorb its losses.[14] The UC privatized and jeopardized its investments. This was not and is not inevitable Staff: The risks taken by the regents promise to harm you, your families, and your colleagues, but you can help. Read the rest of this entry »