reclaimucsd

Posts Tagged ‘Administration’

Publication: Privatization Pamphlet

In California, Privatization, Reclaim Chancellor's Complex on March 4, 2012 at 6:51 pm

The problems facing the California government and the UC are neither permanent nor inevitable. Learn more about the problems, and see the potential solutions. Read the Pamphlet:

Budget Cuts, Fee Hikes, Privatization

More information and commentary is available in the full Report on Privatization, which is the source for most of the research contained in this pamphlet.

Statement of Intentions from the Reclaimers of the Chancellor’s Complex to the UCSD Administration

In California, Privatization on March 3, 2012 at 5:55 am
  • We have initiated a civil, peaceful, and indefinite Reclamation of the UC San Diego Chancellor’s Complex.
  • If the Administration fails to fully implement these six Demands by March 8th, large-scale community action will be taken against the Administration.
  • If the Administration cannot implement any particular Demand(s) by March 8th, they must provide an acceptable justification and a detailed timeline for rapid implementation.
  • Because our assembly is public and promotes transparency, the Administration is invited and encouraged to continue holding meetings in Conference Room 111A for the duration of the Reclamation.
  • We have the right to actively and civilly participate in any such meetings.
  • Furthermore, we insist that the Administration play an advocacy role on behalf of our statewide and national demands.

Sincerely,

A coalition of students, Alumni, faculty, workers, and community members. Read the rest of this entry »

March 1st Demands

In Privatization, Reclaim CLICS on February 27, 2012 at 10:53 pm

STATE OF EMERGENCY: ACTION FOR EDUCATIONAL JUSTICE

University of California, San Diego

March 1, 2012

I. PREFACE

It is with immediate concern that the administration of the University of California, San Diego address issues of upholding the promises of the California Master Plan of Education for an accessible, public, and free University of California. Though the Master Plan does not qualify the meaning of accessibility and equity or address the structural racism of the education system, our expectation is that the University of California be accessible and free regardless of race, socio-economic status, immigration status, or other potential barriers to access.

We, the Public Education Coalition (Faculty, Graduates, Undergraduates, Staff, United Auto Workers, AFSCME Workers, and other workers’ organizations), Reclaim UCSD, the Student Affirmative Action Committee (The Asian Pacific-Islander Student Alliance, Black Student Union, Kaibigang Pilipino, Movimiento Estudiantil Chican@ Aztlan, Muslim Student Association, Native American Student Alliance, Queer People of Color, Students with Disabilities Coalition), and numerous allies at the University of California, San Diego have the following concerns, expectations, and demands:

We, the Students, Faculty, Staff and Workers of the University of California, San Diego, demand that the library formerly known as “CLICS” be reopened, owned and run by and for students and librarians (not under the Executive Vice-Chancellor of Academic Affairs), and refunded by the University through decreases in administrator salaries and student fees and increases in taxes on the wealthy and corporations. In order to pursue these ends, we are committed to uniting with people and movements in all sectors of society, all around the world, from Chile to Puerto Rico, from Greece to Spain, from Egypt to Iran, from Peru to Ireland to the Phillipines, from Occupy Wall Street to Occupied Palestine, from UC Riverside to UC Davis to UC Berkeley, who share our commitment to the empowerment of workers, students, and the unemployed to create an equitable and compassionate society. Our peoples will rise to decolonize UCSD, which is on occupied Kumeyaay land, to decriminalize the border and to smash imperialism and capitalism in our country and throughout the world. Through collective struggle we will reverse the privatization of our University and reclaim public education as a human right for all people. Read the rest of this entry »

CALL TO ACTION: March 1st

In California, Privatization on February 21, 2012 at 2:45 am

[Please share this call to action with your friends, professors, colleagues, TAs, PIs, roommates, and who ever else you think should read it]

Students, instructors and staff you have a stake in the future of the UC. The public nature of the UC is under threat, but on March 1st we are coming together to defend it.

Students, mandatory fees set by the regents have more than doubled since 2001 adjusted for inflation.[1] At the same time, UCSD’s average debt at graduation increased 20%.[2] In 2009, 48% of UCSD students graduated with debt at an average of $18,757.[3] Since 1990 expenditure per student has fallen over 19%.[4] At the same time state support per student fell 60% while tuition support more than tripled.[5] The UC shifted from public funding toward personal, private funding. This shift was not and is not inevitable. Students: the ability of many of your qualified colleagues to attend a UC is threatened by this shift,[6] but you can help.

Instructors, between 1995 and 2010, while positions for teaching in the UC system increased 48%, positions in senior management increased 182%.[7] In 2007, a retired UC Berkeley professor estimated the excess growth in senior management to cost the UC $603 million annually.[8] As instructors retire they are not replaced,[9] and some of your colleagues at UCSD were recently recruited to a private institution.[10] The UC is moving from academic to entrepreneur. This movement is not inevitable. Instructors: the priority for the UC to attract, retain and support your colleagues has been misplaced, but you can help.

Staff, starting in 1999 the UC regents began to funnel pension fund money into riskier investments. Since 2004 billions of dollars have been invested through private investment firms which are non-transparent, lightly regulated, highly risky, and which have charged the UC tens of millions of dollars so far.[11] The UC’s pension and investment portfolios lost $23 billion in the 2008 financial crisis, some of which were made against the advice of a former treasurer[12] and in full awareness of the risk.[13] The UC is now asking for workers to pay into the pension system as they cut benefits to absorb its losses.[14] The UC privatized and jeopardized its investments. This was not and is not inevitable Staff: The risks taken by the regents promise to harm you, your families, and your colleagues, but you can help. Read the rest of this entry »

CLICS Clarifications to Guardian

In Privatization, Reclaim CLICS on February 15, 2012 at 1:01 am

[This letter was published by the UCSD Guardian available here: http://www.ucsdguardian.org/opinion/item/25318-editorials-should-support-student-orgs]

Dear Editors,

Our primary goal is to defend public education by engaging and empowering students. We are not the out-of-touch idealists featured in your article and editorial on January 26th.

The renovation of CLICS was not announced in response to the reclamation last quarter. It was announced in an A.S. Council press release on September 30th, 2011. Last year A.S. killed an $8 student fee to save CLICS, but now it wants to pass a $165 fee for D-1 sports.

Although students have taken responsibility for running CLICS, we have not set its hours, we did not know or plan for it to be open, and University Centers closes the building every night. The administration did not “invite student input” about re-opening CLICS. They re-opened CLICS without communication or negotiation, and only afterwards did they email students.

For a student-run news paper, your editorial board is surprisingly cynical about student-run organizations. The $370,000 you said it would take to run old CLICS is irrelevant to whether students can run a 100 seat study space in the new ‘Galbraith Hall’ (named for Chancellor John S. Galbraith and his lifelong commitment to libraries which have lost 16% of their budget at UCSD).  Running CLICS costs $450,000 annually, but renovation will cost $6,700,000, enough to run CLICS almost fifteen years. Read the rest of this entry »

Publication: Report on the Profitability of Education

In California, Privatization on February 14, 2012 at 11:29 pm

The “Report on the Profitability of Education and the Exploitability of Students” was compiled by two UCSD students, based on the ‘Teach the Budget’ curriculum developed by graduate students at UCSC. It contains detailed sections on the cost of UC tuition, the regents, the state of California, student activism, and much more. It is fully footnoted with emphasis on primary sources.

It is available in a digital format, as well as a printable format, which folds into a booklet. References and Appendix are published online as well.

DIGITAL

PRINTABLE

REFERENCES AND APPENDIX

CLICS: A Recent History

In Privatization, Reclaim CLICS on February 14, 2012 at 11:20 pm

[A skeptical and critical take on the CLICS Reclamation from a conservative, outside perspective can be found at http://skepticconservative.com/2012/01/11/ucsd-clics-break-in-a-story-untold/%5D

What was once CLICS, was opened in 1965 as Humanities/Undergraduate Library, UCSD’s first central library. Ironically, the building, and now the new lecture hall which will replace CLICS, was named after Chancellor John S. Galbraith in 1988 for his “lifelong interest in libraries.” [1]

On January 27th 2011, the UCSD Libraries reported that it had sustained a permanent budget cut of $5 million, and one time cut of $3 million. The libraries objected to Academic Affairs Office’s formula for allocating budget cuts because “1) it bears no discernible relationship to the size of the Libraries’ budget vis-à-vis the campus’ budget and 2) it’s in no way consistent with a stated intention to ‘protect the academic core.’” [2]

In February 2011, it was announced that CLICS, along with the Medical Center Library, Science & Engineering Library, and Scripps Library, would be forced to close due to a $60 million dollar cut to the UCSD budget, which had entailed the $3 million dollar cut to UCSD libraries. The estimated cost saved by closing these four libraries was $1 million annually. [3] Read the rest of this entry »