Disorientation Day 2012

In Disorientation 2012 on October 1, 2012 at 4:35 pm

At long last, the event you’ve been waiting for all summer is here!

If you are a student organization and would like to send this image out to your organization’s email list-servs, please feel free! It’s also not too late to table. If you are interested, send an email to ASAP.

We’ll be keeping the Facebook event (located here: up-to-date with all workshop times, so click attending and invite your friends!

Hope to see you there! And stay tuned with this blog, as we’ll be using it to send out Disorientation Communiqué’s throughout the quarter.

Welcome Back to the Struggle!

In Disorientation 2012, National Politics, Palestine Solidarity, Student-Worker Relations on September 18, 2012 at 11:49 pm

On this, the day after the 1 year anniversary of the inauguration of Occupy Wall Street, it looks as though we know with near certainty who will be elected this coming January. Mitt Romney’s campaign is in shambles, and prominent Democrats like Nancy Pelosi are claiming the the election is sealed for President Obama – and this was BEFORE Romney’s Watergate-scale video that was released. Although some people believe that the comments made in this video are too damning for Romney to continue campaigning, he continues to stand by his statements – and so do his supporters, as I had the misfortune of being told in a Starbucks this evening. Meanwhile, President Obama has successfully appealed the right to indefinitely detain American citizens, and the Chicago Teacher’s Union have suspended their strike (although they have NOT ratified their contract yet).

In light of all this exciting news, and because the school year starts in about a week, it’s time to get this blog up and running again!

I want to give a brief rundown of some of the different things affecting UCSD, and the UC as a whole, and then talk about organizing efforts and some of the things planned here on campus.

Political Propositions:

There are a whole litany of propositions on the ballot this year that are important.

Proposition 30, Jerry Brown’s tax initiative, is a crucial piece of legislation, as it will freeze tuition for a year if passed. However, there is no guarantee that tuition will not go up in the future, even it is passed; if it does not pass, we are facing a 20.3% tuition  increase in January of this year (,0,53917.story)

Proposition 32 is nothing less than an all-out assault on unions. Please take some time to check out the research, who is donating, and why this is bad news for California.

Propositions 34 and 36 deal with prison reform; I don’t know much about them, but I know that they’re important (just like all ballot measures); be sure to research these!

Proposition 37 would require mandatory labeling of all Genetically Modified food. This would be a huge step forward for food justice, and there are a lot of companies like Monsanto fighting against it, so please research this proposition as well.

FROM: The Public Refusal of Privatization: On the “Political Content” of the US Bank Blockade (A Refutation of Brownstein and Amar)

In Uncategorized on May 27, 2012 at 6:45 pm

“To recognize the political content of the blockade, one has to understand its context: UC Davis has a special contract with US Bank, which generates funding for the university from US Bank revenue, in exchange for special advertising services and privileged branch and ATM placement. US Bank profits from student loans, and therefore from rising tuition. The administration gathers funds from US Bank profits, and therefore has an incentive to increase tuition, rather than opposing state cuts to UC funding. Moreover, a US Bank logo appears on all UCD student cards, and these can be used as debit cards at US Bank. To recognize the political content of the US Bank blockade is to understand it within this context. Demonstrators argued that, at a public university, this sort of contract with a private corporation constitutes a conflict of interest. That is: they argued that it is contrary to the public character of the UC.”

To read the article in its entirety, click on this link: